pad

Twenty-One Taras

(Suryagupta Tradition)

  • Artist : Dorje Tamang
  • Produced : 2007
  • Type : Giclee Print
  • Category : Goddesses and Dakinis
  • Original Painting Size : 17 x 24 inches (432 x 610 mm)
  • Original Medium : Gouache and mineral pigments on cotton

Please select the size and format that you require :

Format Image SizePaper Size Price Availability  
A4 Size 7.3 x 10.3 in.
(186 x 262 mm)
8.3 x 11.7 in.
(210 x 297 mm)
£28.00 Produced and despatched within 7 day(s) Add to basket
A4 (Mounted) 7.3 x 10.3 in.
(186 x 262 mm)
11 x 14 in.
(279 x 355 mm)
£42.00 Produced and despatched within 7 day(s) Add to basket
A3 Size 10.7 x 15 in.
(272 x 382 mm)
11.7 x 16.5 in.
(297 x 420 mm)
£54.00 Produced and despatched within 7 day(s) Add to basket
SMALL 10 x 14.2 inches
(255 x 361 mm)
12 x 17 inches
(305 x 432 mm)
£56.00 Produced and despatched within 7 day(s) Add to basket
MEDIUM 14.7 x 21 inches
(375 x 530 mm)
18 x 24 inches
(460 x 610 mm)
£98.00 Produced and despatched within 7 day(s) Add to basket

Twenty-One Taras :

This rare thangka by Dorje Tamang depicts the complete assembly of the twenty-one Taras according to the tradition of the early Indian Buddhist master, Suryagupta. There are essentially three main traditions that depict the twenty-one Taras, the first and most common being the Nagarjuna or Atisha tradition, where the assembly of the twenty-one Taras are virtually identical in their postures and appearance, except for their body colours and the colours of the vases that each holds in their lowered right hands. The second is the Longchenpa tradition, where each of the Taras are also similar in their postures and appearance, except for their body colours, their facial expressions, and the specific attributes that rest upon the lotus flowers that each Tara holds in her left hand. And the third is the Suryagupta tradition, as represented here.

In the Suryagupta tradition each of the twenty-one Taras appears in her own unique iconographic form, colour and posture, and because of this each of the Suryagupta Tara's were usually painted separately as single-deity thangkas. So it is rare to find these twenty-one Taras depicted in a full-assembly composition such as this. Precise textual descriptions are given for each Tara in the Suryagupta tradition, and these have been depicted with complete accurately in this composition. These details include the various colours of each goddess's lotus-throne, their facial expressions, and their specific and often obscure hand-gestures or mudras.

This Giclee print is accompanied by a full textual description of each of the twenty-one Taras, which includes the meaning of their names, their functions, their individual four-line prayer or praises, and their full iconographic descriptions.

© text by Robert Beer

pad